The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

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BillandBen
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The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von BillandBen »

Hi
I am interested in knowing your likes and dislikes about life in UK/Ireland compared to living in your own country especially wrt (with respect to) the people




aylos
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von aylos »

Hello,
I´m studying for one semester in the UK and I come from Germany :D I always thought that British people are very unfriendly and not that open-minded. Now I have to say that I completely changed my mind and that it only was a prejudice! Living in the UK is not that different as living in Germany. But in my point of view the people here are so kind and so friendly. Even when you´re in the supermarket or when you ask someone for the right way they are so lovely. But the prices for even basic foods are so high. So England is much more expensive than Germany. In the university and in ther everyday life there are also no huge differences :)
Folgende Benutzer bedankten sich beim Autor aylos für den Beitrag:
Keswick

Keswick
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von Keswick »

aylos hat geschrieben:Hello,

I'm studying in the UK for one semester and I come from Germany :D I always thought that British people are very unfriendly and not that open-minded. Now I have to say that I completely changed my mind and that it only was a prejudice! Living in the UK is not that different from living in Germany. But in my point of view the people here are so kind and so friendly. Even when you're in the supermarket or when you ask someone for the right way they are so lovely. But the prices for even basic foods are so high. So England is much more expensive than Germany. In the university and in ther everyday life there are also no huge differences :)



My knowledge of German prizes has shifted a bit but I think it depends on where you go shopping. I think the cheapest place to go shopping to is Asda. I like Asda, for the simple reason that you can order your stuff online and have it delivered to your door at a small charge of £3,- to £5,- (depends on the day and time slot). I think that's a big difference between Germany and the UK, or is there online shopping and delivery available in Germany now?
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ibex
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von ibex »

I like the UK, especially England, and its atmosphere - and not least its incredibly beautiful language. Anyway, I've heard that Christmas is a lot different there, more "partylike" and less "besinnlich", as we call it. Is that true?

I do not know a lot about Christmas in England, except for that they have their "Father Christmas" and Plumpudding, when I remember it correctly. And there are also these crackers...
I heard that British people also watch a lot of TV on Christmas too... Really? I think that's somehow weird. No one in our family would think of watching TV on Christmas Eve or on the 25th, except then for the news, maybe.

Anyway - I'm looking forward to your answers, and will now leave - to decorate the Christmas tree :mrgreen:

See you.

Keswick
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von Keswick »

ibex hat geschrieben:I like the UK, especially England, and its atmosphere - and not least its incredibly beautiful language. Anyway, I've heard that Christmas is a lot different there, more "partylike" and less "besinnlich", as we call it. Is that true?

Not really, it depends on the people. I personally prefer quiet Christmas. Today for example we are going to see my sister and brother-in-law to celebrate German Christmas, tomorrow we're going to see the in-laws for Christmas dinner. Afterwards we're going to have a couple of drinks but there won't be a big party or anything. And on boxing day we have invited some people over to our place to have a meal. No party either. I don't doubt that there are people who have big Christmas parties with lots of booze, however I think that's younger people, aged in their early 20's. The people we are going to see are all 30+, probably rather boring for some...
ibex hat geschrieben:
I do not know a lot about Christmas in England, except for that they have their "Father Christmas" and Plumpudding, when I remember it correctly. And there are also these crackers...

Father Christmas is used in America, in the UK we call him Santa Claus. As for the Christmas Pudding, while the basics are always the same, you can get that in a huge variety of versions. The traditional one (which nowadays isn't called plum pudding anymore) is soaked in brandy but you can get them with cider now, or orange liqueur etc. I have a classical one this year, and I will be serving it with custard and brandy butter. Yes, Christmas crackers! You have to have those. They look like bonbons and two people each pull an end to make them "crack". Inside you normally find a paper crown (which has to be worn!! No getting out of this one!!), as well as a (bad) joke and a little toy. It's all about fun really! Also what you find a lot are table games, for example bells. One of the guests is the conductor, the others have a bell each and the conductor is pointing at random people and they ring their bell. The person who guesses the Christmas song first wins. Might sound stupid, but it's good fun really :mrgreen: .

ibex hat geschrieben: I heard that British people also watch a lot of TV on Christmas too... Really? I think that's somehow weird. No one in our family would think of watching TV on Christmas Eve or on the 25th, except then for the news, maybe.

That also depends on the family, it's always better not to believe such generalised statements ;-) . Fact is mind, that people do watch the Queen's speech on Christmas Day at 3pm- that's obligatory :mrgreen:.
ibex hat geschrieben: Anyway - I'm looking forward to your answers, and will now leave - to decorate the Christmas

I have my decoration up since the 12th night before Christmas! :big_thumb:




Merry Christmas ibex! :freu:
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Duckduck
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von Duckduck »

Huhu an Euch Alle!!!

Ich wünsche jedem Einzelnen von Euch ein frohes Fest :santa: und gute Weihnachtstage! Und dann sollt Ihr auch perfekt ins neue Jahr rutschen :prost: :zpop: , welches Euch hoffentlich viel Freude, Glück und Gesundheit beschert. :freu:

xyz
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von Assistenzlehrer »

Duckduck hat geschrieben:Huhu an Euch Alle!!!

Ich wünsche jedem Einzelnen von Euch ein frohes Fest :santa: und gute Weihnachtstage! Und dann sollt Ihr auch perfekt ins neue Jahr rutschen :prost: :zpop: , welches Euch hoffentlich viel Freude, Glück und Gesundheit beschert. :freu:


Duckduck
Danke Duckduck ich wünsche euch auch schöne Weihnachten und einen guten Rutsch, auf das Englischhilfenforum 2012 wieder gut besucht wird.

Ein frohes Fest wünscht

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ibex
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von ibex »

Thanks for your answers :freu: and Merry Christmas too, Keswick!

Anyway, what I don't understand is this:
Keswick hat geschrieben:Father Christmas is used in America, in the UK we call him Santa Claus.
:question: :question: I actually thought it was the other way round. Santa (Claus) in the USA and Father Christmas in the UK.

However - have nice holidays altogether! :santa:

lots of love
ibex

Keswick
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von Keswick »

Sorry, all I can tell you is what I know and I have been living in the UK for some years now. To be sure I double-checked with my better half (English) and he agrees on what I said in the first place :) .

Have a good start into the new year! :wink:
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tiorthan
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von tiorthan »

There is no Father Christmas vs Santa distinction in modern English and the Name "Father Christmas" is used synonymously with "Santa Claus" by most people. Virtually everyone knows "Santa Claus", there are however many people who have never heard of "Father Christmas" who is called seldom these days.

Historically they have been different "persons". The modern "Santa Claus" is a merger of both concepts.
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MistakeSuggestionYou sure that's right?

Keswick
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von Keswick »

I thought the question was what was more commonly used, and in the UK this still is Santa Claus. Historically there is no 100% evidence, however Ethnological concepts speak of at least 4 different origins for Santa Claus. I wrote an essay about that at uni, not sure whether I still have it though but I can have a look if you're interested.

Regards,
Keswick .. passionate Cultural Anthropologist with Christmas as one of her majors.. how sad am I ? :rolleyes:
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tiorthan
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von tiorthan »

Keswick hat geschrieben:I thought the question was what was more commonly used, and in the UK this still is Santa Claus.
Sorry, I should have made myself more clear. Santa Claus is commonly used in all English speaking countries and consequently in the UK, too. Father Christmas on the other hand is not regularly used anywhere in modern English, it is merely seen an alternative name for Santa Claus understood by virtually everyone but used by only few. This is based on a survey about the use of Christmas terms in modern day English.
Historically there is no 100% evidence, however Ethnological concepts speak of at least 4 different origins for Santa Claus.
All too true. Again leaving out a concluding sentence from my previous post has led to some misunderstanding here. I can (with some certainty) say that the names themselves (from a linguistical point of view) have different origins but since I'm not an anthropologist – beyond what I need in linguistics – I cannot say how many ethnological sources each of the names incorporates.
Keswick .. passionate Cultural Anthropologist with Christmas as one of her majors.. how sad am I ? :rolleyes:
I fail to see in what way that is sad.
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Keswick
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von Keswick »

tiorthan hat geschrieben:I fail to see in what way that is sad.



:big_thumb: Cheers mate!
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hertsgirl
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von hertsgirl »

tiorthan hat geschrieben:
Keswick hat geschrieben:I thought the question was what was more commonly used, and in the UK this still is Santa Claus.
Sorry, I should have made myself more clear. Santa Claus is commonly used in all English speaking countries and consequently in the UK, too. Father Christmas on the other hand is not regularly used anywhere in modern English, it is merely seen an alternative name for Santa Claus understood by virtually everyone but used by only few. This is based on a survey about the use of Christmas terms in modern day English.

I find that very, very difficult to believe. Father Christmas is widely used in Britain, particularly by those who dislike the over-commercialism and Americanisation of Christmas that the name "Santa Claus" symbolises for many British people. This includes the names of products e.g. a Father Christmas chocolate, a Father Christmas bauble. Santa Claus is regarded in Britain as North American, but due to the influence of American popular culture, it is now widely used in Britain too. The meanings of the two are now seen as exactly the same, but depending on one's preferences (attitude to Americanisation etc), people use Santa Claus or Father Christmas. I think you can guess which one my family always used!
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cesar85
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Re: The differences between Uk/Ireland and your country

Beitrag von cesar85 »

Hi guys,
Ich studierte zwei and halb jahre deutsch, aber es ist zu kompliziert für mir...
So i'm going to write in english.
I'm a 26yo guy from Spain and, at this moment i am currently studying english in Northern Ireland.
The most important difference for me is the food because the spanish food is very different to the irish food. As aylos said, the food is very expensive here, and not only the food, public transport is terrible and more expensive than spanish public transport.
But, for me, the most important difference is weather, I'm from Madrid and the summer is hot there but winter is very cold. Here, in Belfast, the weather is nice, maybe it rains a lot and summer isn't so hot but i like this weather.
Anyway, I think i'm going to continue living here.
At this moment i'm studying and working because i have an agreement with MovingOn Courses, they teach me english and i help them translating text into spanish and some administrative work but i can't stay here in Summer (because they organize a summer course in Cork), so I will look for a bedroom in a share flat to improve my english and i will try to find another job.
Work as a free helper in MovingOn Courses and receive an English Course

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